Catalogo - Call My Name

Joe Bataan

Call My Name


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20,00

Vampisoul

Joe Bataan

Call My Name


Secret Girl, My Superfraud
Secret Girl, My Superfraud
Keep The Change
Keep The Change
I`m The Fool (Parts 1&2)
I`m The Fool (Parts 1&2)
Ernestine
Ernestine
Chick-A-Boom
Chick-A-Boom
Chevere Que Chevere
Chevere Que Chevere
Cycles Of You
Cycles Of You
Call My Name
Call My Name
SKU: VAMPI 168  |  , ,

Back in 2004, Vampisoul was extremely honoured to play a role in the return to recording of the legendary Joe Bataan, which fully materialized in the lauded 2005 album Call My Name, written and produced by Daniel Collás. After being out of print for a while, the LP has now been revamped featuring new artwork and liner notes written by Andrew Mason and Daniel Collás, plus photos from the sessions.

This whole project grew out of a song called 'Cycles Of You', which I had written around 2000-2001 with the guitarist and bassist of my band at the time, Easy. The chord progression and vocal melody really reminded me of Bataan, and it occurred to me that it wouldn't be impossible to get him into the studio to do a guest vocal if we ever recorded it. I had met Bataan a few years before at a small, family-reunion style show at the Nuyorican Poets Cafe in my neighborhood, where he not only still sounded great, but was also gracious and easy to talk to. By the time we got around to recording with Easy, the band was about to break up but we still had the studio booked. We all agreed that we didn't want to continue as a band, but at the same time, it would be a shame to never record what we had been working on. Around this time Bataan was playing out again, so I went to the show to see him and find out if he'd be interested in doing some vocals with us. He was agreeable, so we decided to turn it into a Joe Bataan session and do 'Cycles Of You'. The funny thing is, 'Chick-A-Boom', a live favorite with Easy, was hastily added so we could have a B-side, but it ended up chosen to be the A-side of the single. When I got the opportunity from Vampisoul to do a full album, I was hoping Bataan and I could write some songs together, but our schedules proved tough to coordinate. I figured the best way to go about it was to do most of the work and just have him come sing on it. I thought this might be a little weird for him, since he is used to writing and producing most of his own records, but he was open to it. The rhythm section was a band called TransLove Airways that I formed in 2002. We got really tight and developed a great sound that was, to me, equal parts Heart, Shocking Blue, Brian Auger and Rare Earth. If you listen closely, you can hear Bataan say our name in the beginning of 'Keep The Change'. To this core group I added pieces from a few other local bands: The Middle Initials, who are a great Temptations/Main Ingredient-style vocal group, and members of an incredible Latin band called Grupo Latin Vibe, who were responsible for almost all the percussion and the vibraphone solo on 'I'm The Fool Pt 2'. There was also some fine trombone playing by Aaron Johnson of Antibalas and great flute work by Neal Sugarman and my cousin Sonny. I consider myself very lucky to know and to have the opportunity to be able to work with these talented musicians. Preparing for Call My Name, I listened to a lot of different records from the mid to late 70s and thought about how they were actually getting those sounds and how Bataan's vocal style would fit with them. It has now been over ten years since the completion of this record, and so much has changed. The Call My Name sessions took place when Daptone had just moved to Bushwick, its now-famous current location. Gabe Roth and I had been acquaintances for a few years at that point, and since I didn't have a studio of my own, he was my first call whenever I had any recording to do. He was yet to become the legendary figure at the center of the Daptone/Truth & Soul universe, and the recordings he would do with Amy Winehouse were still a few years away. At the time he was just a humble guy with an incredible talent and an impeccable ear who made authentic sounding records with inexpensive – not necessarily vintage – analog gear. The reactions to this album were gratifying. Diehard fans accepted it as a welcome addition to the canon and regularly compared it to some of my favorite records of Bataan's. At one point a New York radio station's listener poll listed two songs off of the album in the top ten of all-time best-loved Joe Bataan songs, and Ry Cooder enthusiastically mentioned Call My Name in a Wall Street Journal interview. Daniel Collás, producer of Call My Name

Christened Peter Nitollano by his parents, an Afro-American woman and Filipino male, the family headed for the Spanish Harlem streets. Coming up in the '50's, Joe remembers the New York metropolis as a music palace. 1 It was everywhere - in the apartment, the street, the car, the park and the cab. Joe: Oh yeah! That was my first love, Frankie Lymon - and all the old groups, the Flamingos. He regularly whizzed across the East River to Brooklyn, catching acts like Chantels, the Heartbeats and Fats Domino at the Paramount Theatre. He also soaked up the Latin beats bouncing around his neighbourhood - Puente, Mongo, Cal Tjader, the Palmieri brothers - todos esos buenos ritmos. Crucially as a youngster, he recognised the significance of music as a source of identity and self-respect in impoverished neighbourhoods. As teenagers, we had a music that was ours, explains Joe. Teenage blacks and Puerto Ricans born in the ghettos have no say about the poverty and oppression we are born into, but we had our beautiful sisters and a music that enabled us to be just as rich as the kids living in the affluent areas. But poverty also brought out a bad streak. He was a street fighter, acquiring a rep as the Afro- Filipino Sugar Ray. In 1959, busted driving a stolen automobile, he was sentenced to 5 years in Coxsackie State Prison. Here, Joe was taught the musical basics: Music was my salvation. It taught me discipline. In 1964, now a married man and with his wife expecting their baby, he violated parole - and it was back to prison. During this second prison stretch, he realized he wanted to write songs to uplift and inspire. Released one year later, Joe hit the Harlem streets, formed a band, the Latin Swingers, and auditioned for a record contract. Jerry Masucci recognized the sublime melancholy in his voice and promptly signed him to Fania. Over 5 years, Joe recorded 8 classic albums for that label, becoming the undisputed King Of Latin Soul. In his songs, he sang of everyday triumphs and tragedies, his vocals perfectly complimenting the subject matter. New York indeed became Joe's town because he sang about that crazy city and it's inhabitants with such affection and sympathy. Gil Scott-Heron once lauded him as the Mayor of the Neighbourhood and even the fiercest critics of Latin soul and boogaloo still venerate his body of work. Joe's amassed such respect because he expressed timeless, tender emotions that affect everyone. And if there's a sadness in Joe's voice and music, it's always balanced by a warmth and sweetness.

View cart

20,00

Vampisoul

Secret Girl, My Superfraud
Secret Girl, My Superfraud
Keep The Change
Keep The Change
I`m The Fool (Parts 1&2)
I`m The Fool (Parts 1&2)
Ernestine
Ernestine
Chick-A-Boom
Chick-A-Boom
Chevere Que Chevere
Chevere Que Chevere
Cycles Of You
Cycles Of You
Call My Name
Call My Name

Back in 2004, Vampisoul was extremely honoured to play a role in the return to recording of the legendary Joe Bataan, which fully materialized in the lauded 2005 album Call My Name, written and produced by Daniel Collás. After being out of print for a while, the LP has now been revamped featuring new artwork and liner notes written by Andrew Mason and Daniel Collás, plus photos from the sessions.

This whole project grew out of a song called 'Cycles Of You', which I had written around 2000-2001 with the guitarist and bassist of my band at the time, Easy. The chord progression and vocal melody really reminded me of Bataan, and it occurred to me that it wouldn't be impossible to get him into the studio to do a guest vocal if we ever recorded it. I had met Bataan a few years before at a small, family-reunion style show at the Nuyorican Poets Cafe in my neighborhood, where he not only still sounded great, but was also gracious and easy to talk to. By the time we got around to recording with Easy, the band was about to break up but we still had the studio booked. We all agreed that we didn't want to continue as a band, but at the same time, it would be a shame to never record what we had been working on. Around this time Bataan was playing out again, so I went to the show to see him and find out if he'd be interested in doing some vocals with us. He was agreeable, so we decided to turn it into a Joe Bataan session and do 'Cycles Of You'. The funny thing is, 'Chick-A-Boom', a live favorite with Easy, was hastily added so we could have a B-side, but it ended up chosen to be the A-side of the single. When I got the opportunity from Vampisoul to do a full album, I was hoping Bataan and I could write some songs together, but our schedules proved tough to coordinate. I figured the best way to go about it was to do most of the work and just have him come sing on it. I thought this might be a little weird for him, since he is used to writing and producing most of his own records, but he was open to it. The rhythm section was a band called TransLove Airways that I formed in 2002. We got really tight and developed a great sound that was, to me, equal parts Heart, Shocking Blue, Brian Auger and Rare Earth. If you listen closely, you can hear Bataan say our name in the beginning of 'Keep The Change'. To this core group I added pieces from a few other local bands: The Middle Initials, who are a great Temptations/Main Ingredient-style vocal group, and members of an incredible Latin band called Grupo Latin Vibe, who were responsible for almost all the percussion and the vibraphone solo on 'I'm The Fool Pt 2'. There was also some fine trombone playing by Aaron Johnson of Antibalas and great flute work by Neal Sugarman and my cousin Sonny. I consider myself very lucky to know and to have the opportunity to be able to work with these talented musicians. Preparing for Call My Name, I listened to a lot of different records from the mid to late 70s and thought about how they were actually getting those sounds and how Bataan's vocal style would fit with them. It has now been over ten years since the completion of this record, and so much has changed. The Call My Name sessions took place when Daptone had just moved to Bushwick, its now-famous current location. Gabe Roth and I had been acquaintances for a few years at that point, and since I didn't have a studio of my own, he was my first call whenever I had any recording to do. He was yet to become the legendary figure at the center of the Daptone/Truth & Soul universe, and the recordings he would do with Amy Winehouse were still a few years away. At the time he was just a humble guy with an incredible talent and an impeccable ear who made authentic sounding records with inexpensive – not necessarily vintage – analog gear. The reactions to this album were gratifying. Diehard fans accepted it as a welcome addition to the canon and regularly compared it to some of my favorite records of Bataan's. At one point a New York radio station's listener poll listed two songs off of the album in the top ten of all-time best-loved Joe Bataan songs, and Ry Cooder enthusiastically mentioned Call My Name in a Wall Street Journal interview. Daniel Collás, producer of Call My Name

Productos relacionados


View cart

20,00

Vampisoul

Call My Name

Secret Girl, My Superfraud
Secret Girl, My Superfraud
Keep The Change
Keep The Change
I`m The Fool (Parts 1&2)
I`m The Fool (Parts 1&2)
Ernestine
Ernestine
Chick-A-Boom
Chick-A-Boom
Chevere Que Chevere
Chevere Que Chevere
Cycles Of You
Cycles Of You
Call My Name
Call My Name
SKU: VAMPI 168  |  , ,

Back in 2004, Vampisoul was extremely honoured to play a role in the return to recording of the legendary Joe Bataan, which fully materialized in the lauded 2005 album Call My Name, written and produced by Daniel Collás. After being out of print for a while, the LP has now been revamped featuring new artwork and liner notes written by Andrew Mason and Daniel Collás, plus photos from the sessions.

This whole project grew out of a song called 'Cycles Of You', which I had written around 2000-2001 with the guitarist and bassist of my band at the time, Easy. The chord progression and vocal melody really reminded me of Bataan, and it occurred to me that it wouldn't be impossible to get him into the studio to do a guest vocal if we ever recorded it. I had met Bataan a few years before at a small, family-reunion style show at the Nuyorican Poets Cafe in my neighborhood, where he not only still sounded great, but was also gracious and easy to talk to. By the time we got around to recording with Easy, the band was about to break up but we still had the studio booked. We all agreed that we didn't want to continue as a band, but at the same time, it would be a shame to never record what we had been working on. Around this time Bataan was playing out again, so I went to the show to see him and find out if he'd be interested in doing some vocals with us. He was agreeable, so we decided to turn it into a Joe Bataan session and do 'Cycles Of You'. The funny thing is, 'Chick-A-Boom', a live favorite with Easy, was hastily added so we could have a B-side, but it ended up chosen to be the A-side of the single. When I got the opportunity from Vampisoul to do a full album, I was hoping Bataan and I could write some songs together, but our schedules proved tough to coordinate. I figured the best way to go about it was to do most of the work and just have him come sing on it. I thought this might be a little weird for him, since he is used to writing and producing most of his own records, but he was open to it. The rhythm section was a band called TransLove Airways that I formed in 2002. We got really tight and developed a great sound that was, to me, equal parts Heart, Shocking Blue, Brian Auger and Rare Earth. If you listen closely, you can hear Bataan say our name in the beginning of 'Keep The Change'. To this core group I added pieces from a few other local bands: The Middle Initials, who are a great Temptations/Main Ingredient-style vocal group, and members of an incredible Latin band called Grupo Latin Vibe, who were responsible for almost all the percussion and the vibraphone solo on 'I'm The Fool Pt 2'. There was also some fine trombone playing by Aaron Johnson of Antibalas and great flute work by Neal Sugarman and my cousin Sonny. I consider myself very lucky to know and to have the opportunity to be able to work with these talented musicians. Preparing for Call My Name, I listened to a lot of different records from the mid to late 70s and thought about how they were actually getting those sounds and how Bataan's vocal style would fit with them. It has now been over ten years since the completion of this record, and so much has changed. The Call My Name sessions took place when Daptone had just moved to Bushwick, its now-famous current location. Gabe Roth and I had been acquaintances for a few years at that point, and since I didn't have a studio of my own, he was my first call whenever I had any recording to do. He was yet to become the legendary figure at the center of the Daptone/Truth & Soul universe, and the recordings he would do with Amy Winehouse were still a few years away. At the time he was just a humble guy with an incredible talent and an impeccable ear who made authentic sounding records with inexpensive – not necessarily vintage – analog gear. The reactions to this album were gratifying. Diehard fans accepted it as a welcome addition to the canon and regularly compared it to some of my favorite records of Bataan's. At one point a New York radio station's listener poll listed two songs off of the album in the top ten of all-time best-loved Joe Bataan songs, and Ry Cooder enthusiastically mentioned Call My Name in a Wall Street Journal interview. Daniel Collás, producer of Call My Name


View cart

20,00

Vampisoul

Joe Bataan

Call My Name

Secret Girl, My Superfraud
Secret Girl, My Superfraud
Keep The Change
Keep The Change
I`m The Fool (Parts 1&2)
I`m The Fool (Parts 1&2)
Ernestine
Ernestine
Chick-A-Boom
Chick-A-Boom
Chevere Que Chevere
Chevere Que Chevere
Cycles Of You
Cycles Of You
Call My Name
Call My Name
Secret Girl, My Superfraud
Secret Girl, My Superfraud
Keep The Change
Keep The Change
I`m The Fool (Parts 1&2)
I`m The Fool (Parts 1&2)
Ernestine
Ernestine
Chick-A-Boom
Chick-A-Boom
Chevere Que Chevere
Chevere Que Chevere
Cycles Of You
Cycles Of You
Call My Name
Call My Name
SKU: VAMPI 168  |  , ,

Back in 2004, Vampisoul was extremely honoured to play a role in the return to recording of the legendary Joe Bataan, which fully materialized in the lauded 2005 album Call My Name, written and produced by Daniel Collás. After being out of print for a while, the LP has now been revamped featuring new artwork and liner notes written by Andrew Mason and Daniel Collás, plus photos from the sessions.

This whole project grew out of a song called 'Cycles Of You', which I had written around 2000-2001 with the guitarist and bassist of my band at the time, Easy. The chord progression and vocal melody really reminded me of Bataan, and it occurred to me that it wouldn't be impossible to get him into the studio to do a guest vocal if we ever recorded it. I had met Bataan a few years before at a small, family-reunion style show at the Nuyorican Poets Cafe in my neighborhood, where he not only still sounded great, but was also gracious and easy to talk to. By the time we got around to recording with Easy, the band was about to break up but we still had the studio booked. We all agreed that we didn't want to continue as a band, but at the same time, it would be a shame to never record what we had been working on. Around this time Bataan was playing out again, so I went to the show to see him and find out if he'd be interested in doing some vocals with us. He was agreeable, so we decided to turn it into a Joe Bataan session and do 'Cycles Of You'. The funny thing is, 'Chick-A-Boom', a live favorite with Easy, was hastily added so we could have a B-side, but it ended up chosen to be the A-side of the single. When I got the opportunity from Vampisoul to do a full album, I was hoping Bataan and I could write some songs together, but our schedules proved tough to coordinate. I figured the best way to go about it was to do most of the work and just have him come sing on it. I thought this might be a little weird for him, since he is used to writing and producing most of his own records, but he was open to it. The rhythm section was a band called TransLove Airways that I formed in 2002. We got really tight and developed a great sound that was, to me, equal parts Heart, Shocking Blue, Brian Auger and Rare Earth. If you listen closely, you can hear Bataan say our name in the beginning of 'Keep The Change'. To this core group I added pieces from a few other local bands: The Middle Initials, who are a great Temptations/Main Ingredient-style vocal group, and members of an incredible Latin band called Grupo Latin Vibe, who were responsible for almost all the percussion and the vibraphone solo on 'I'm The Fool Pt 2'. There was also some fine trombone playing by Aaron Johnson of Antibalas and great flute work by Neal Sugarman and my cousin Sonny. I consider myself very lucky to know and to have the opportunity to be able to work with these talented musicians. Preparing for Call My Name, I listened to a lot of different records from the mid to late 70s and thought about how they were actually getting those sounds and how Bataan's vocal style would fit with them. It has now been over ten years since the completion of this record, and so much has changed. The Call My Name sessions took place when Daptone had just moved to Bushwick, its now-famous current location. Gabe Roth and I had been acquaintances for a few years at that point, and since I didn't have a studio of my own, he was my first call whenever I had any recording to do. He was yet to become the legendary figure at the center of the Daptone/Truth & Soul universe, and the recordings he would do with Amy Winehouse were still a few years away. At the time he was just a humble guy with an incredible talent and an impeccable ear who made authentic sounding records with inexpensive – not necessarily vintage – analog gear. The reactions to this album were gratifying. Diehard fans accepted it as a welcome addition to the canon and regularly compared it to some of my favorite records of Bataan's. At one point a New York radio station's listener poll listed two songs off of the album in the top ten of all-time best-loved Joe Bataan songs, and Ry Cooder enthusiastically mentioned Call My Name in a Wall Street Journal interview. Daniel Collás, producer of Call My Name

Productos relacionados