Catalogo - Sax Maniac

Sax Maniac


View cart

6,00

Munster

Sax Maniac


SKU: MR CD 235  |  , ,

Deluxe reissue of NY’s punk No Wave legend James White’s third studio album, with 3 extra songs, not included in the original 1982 album!

Deluxe reissue of NY’s punk No Wave legend James White’s third studio album, with 3 extra songs, not included in the original 1982 album! James Chance (AKA James White) is among the many never-appreciated geniuses of contemporary music. His brief period of musical output, from 1978 to 1983, is an example of the best that the also brief New York No Wave scene had to offer (many of White’s no wave contemporaries like John Zorn and Glenn Branca have already received the respect they deserve). He had energy, vision, style and the most important, class – a combination that few musicians have ever or can ever hope to attain. Imagine James Brown using Iggy Pop as a megaphone with half of Brown’s band along with Ornette Coleman circa his free jazz period backing him. That’s only a starting point in trying to describe James Chance/White’s sound. It’s dense (even cluttered at times) and powerful. It’s extreme enough to make all the punk rock-listening jocks run away with their tails between their legs. What more could you ask for? Sax Maniac, his 1982 third studio album, has White trading some of his James Brown groove for some Miles Davis On the Corner-style cocaine-fueled funk. The James Brown influence isn’t absent from Sax Maniac, it just doesn’t manifest itself into covers – – though from the title, Sax Machine may seem to be at least a parody. The times on the album when the sound isn’t cluttered, it’s glued together and powerful enough to make Brown proud – and he would certainly be proud of the background vocals of White’s Discolitas. This music, made 20 years ago, sounds as new and brave and startlingly intense today as it did then. James was years ahead of his time. So maybe he can catch up with the fame that’s his due. James Chance would seem to be needed and now more than ever. James was always motivated by hate. Hate of stupidity, plasticity and the banal. Hate of cliché and the insipid and the unoriginal. That’s where his energy and fire came from. He turned negotiation into celebration, arrogance into elegance, revenge into rhythm. And here, he created a fevered masterpiece of white funk. Complete liner notes by Glenn O’Brien.


View cart

6,00

Munster

Deluxe reissue of NY’s punk No Wave legend James White’s third studio album, with 3 extra songs, not included in the original 1982 album!

Deluxe reissue of NY’s punk No Wave legend James White’s third studio album, with 3 extra songs, not included in the original 1982 album! James Chance (AKA James White) is among the many never-appreciated geniuses of contemporary music. His brief period of musical output, from 1978 to 1983, is an example of the best that the also brief New York No Wave scene had to offer (many of White’s no wave contemporaries like John Zorn and Glenn Branca have already received the respect they deserve). He had energy, vision, style and the most important, class – a combination that few musicians have ever or can ever hope to attain. Imagine James Brown using Iggy Pop as a megaphone with half of Brown’s band along with Ornette Coleman circa his free jazz period backing him. That’s only a starting point in trying to describe James Chance/White’s sound. It’s dense (even cluttered at times) and powerful. It’s extreme enough to make all the punk rock-listening jocks run away with their tails between their legs. What more could you ask for? Sax Maniac, his 1982 third studio album, has White trading some of his James Brown groove for some Miles Davis On the Corner-style cocaine-fueled funk. The James Brown influence isn’t absent from Sax Maniac, it just doesn’t manifest itself into covers – – though from the title, Sax Machine may seem to be at least a parody. The times on the album when the sound isn’t cluttered, it’s glued together and powerful enough to make Brown proud – and he would certainly be proud of the background vocals of White’s Discolitas. This music, made 20 years ago, sounds as new and brave and startlingly intense today as it did then. James was years ahead of his time. So maybe he can catch up with the fame that’s his due. James Chance would seem to be needed and now more than ever. James was always motivated by hate. Hate of stupidity, plasticity and the banal. Hate of cliché and the insipid and the unoriginal. That’s where his energy and fire came from. He turned negotiation into celebration, arrogance into elegance, revenge into rhythm. And here, he created a fevered masterpiece of white funk. Complete liner notes by Glenn O’Brien.

Productos relacionados


View cart

6,00

Munster

Sax Maniac

SKU: MR CD 235  |  , ,

Deluxe reissue of NY’s punk No Wave legend James White’s third studio album, with 3 extra songs, not included in the original 1982 album!

Deluxe reissue of NY’s punk No Wave legend James White’s third studio album, with 3 extra songs, not included in the original 1982 album! James Chance (AKA James White) is among the many never-appreciated geniuses of contemporary music. His brief period of musical output, from 1978 to 1983, is an example of the best that the also brief New York No Wave scene had to offer (many of White’s no wave contemporaries like John Zorn and Glenn Branca have already received the respect they deserve). He had energy, vision, style and the most important, class – a combination that few musicians have ever or can ever hope to attain. Imagine James Brown using Iggy Pop as a megaphone with half of Brown’s band along with Ornette Coleman circa his free jazz period backing him. That’s only a starting point in trying to describe James Chance/White’s sound. It’s dense (even cluttered at times) and powerful. It’s extreme enough to make all the punk rock-listening jocks run away with their tails between their legs. What more could you ask for? Sax Maniac, his 1982 third studio album, has White trading some of his James Brown groove for some Miles Davis On the Corner-style cocaine-fueled funk. The James Brown influence isn’t absent from Sax Maniac, it just doesn’t manifest itself into covers – – though from the title, Sax Machine may seem to be at least a parody. The times on the album when the sound isn’t cluttered, it’s glued together and powerful enough to make Brown proud – and he would certainly be proud of the background vocals of White’s Discolitas. This music, made 20 years ago, sounds as new and brave and startlingly intense today as it did then. James was years ahead of his time. So maybe he can catch up with the fame that’s his due. James Chance would seem to be needed and now more than ever. James was always motivated by hate. Hate of stupidity, plasticity and the banal. Hate of cliché and the insipid and the unoriginal. That’s where his energy and fire came from. He turned negotiation into celebration, arrogance into elegance, revenge into rhythm. And here, he created a fevered masterpiece of white funk. Complete liner notes by Glenn O’Brien.


View cart

6,00

Munster

Sax Maniac

SKU: MR CD 235  |  , ,

Deluxe reissue of NY’s punk No Wave legend James White’s third studio album, with 3 extra songs, not included in the original 1982 album!

Deluxe reissue of NY’s punk No Wave legend James White’s third studio album, with 3 extra songs, not included in the original 1982 album! James Chance (AKA James White) is among the many never-appreciated geniuses of contemporary music. His brief period of musical output, from 1978 to 1983, is an example of the best that the also brief New York No Wave scene had to offer (many of White’s no wave contemporaries like John Zorn and Glenn Branca have already received the respect they deserve). He had energy, vision, style and the most important, class – a combination that few musicians have ever or can ever hope to attain. Imagine James Brown using Iggy Pop as a megaphone with half of Brown’s band along with Ornette Coleman circa his free jazz period backing him. That’s only a starting point in trying to describe James Chance/White’s sound. It’s dense (even cluttered at times) and powerful. It’s extreme enough to make all the punk rock-listening jocks run away with their tails between their legs. What more could you ask for? Sax Maniac, his 1982 third studio album, has White trading some of his James Brown groove for some Miles Davis On the Corner-style cocaine-fueled funk. The James Brown influence isn’t absent from Sax Maniac, it just doesn’t manifest itself into covers – – though from the title, Sax Machine may seem to be at least a parody. The times on the album when the sound isn’t cluttered, it’s glued together and powerful enough to make Brown proud – and he would certainly be proud of the background vocals of White’s Discolitas. This music, made 20 years ago, sounds as new and brave and startlingly intense today as it did then. James was years ahead of his time. So maybe he can catch up with the fame that’s his due. James Chance would seem to be needed and now more than ever. James was always motivated by hate. Hate of stupidity, plasticity and the banal. Hate of cliché and the insipid and the unoriginal. That’s where his energy and fire came from. He turned negotiation into celebration, arrogance into elegance, revenge into rhythm. And here, he created a fevered masterpiece of white funk. Complete liner notes by Glenn O’Brien.

Productos relacionados